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  1. PiHelper: A Native Companion App for your Pi-hole

    Ads are an unfortunate byproduct of the freemium internet that we've collectively chosen through our actions, and worse yet are the trackers they've inspired to follow everyone around our online lives. As someone who values their online privacy, I was elated to stumble upon Pi-hole, a network-wide ad blocker. Sure …

  2. Reading Files from a Tar Archive

    TIL you can quickly read files from a tar archive with this command:

    tar xOf <tar-file> <file-you-want-to-read-here>
    

    This works even if the file is compressed. You can get a list of all the files in the archive by running this:

    tar tf <tar-file>
    
  3. Moving to cgit

    Earlier this year I wrote a blog post on how to set up gitweb in order to be able to view your repositories in a browser. Originally my intent for using gitweb was not for my own personal use but more to be able to share my code with the …

  4. Adding C Code to your Android App

    Create a new project, or download the zip file/clone the repo from here. I've chosen to start with a new project targeting API 15 and up, including Kotlin support and the AndroidX libraries.

    Side note: you could just create a C++ project at the Activity selection screen. That's not …

  5. App Shortcuts in iOS 13

    App Shortcuts (also known as Home Screen Quick Actions), are the nice little popups that allow users to quickly jump into a specific section of your app, as seen in the screenshot below.

    Apple has a really nice guide on how to implement these in your own apps, but the …

  6. Quickly Sending Code as a Git Patch

    The other day at work I was helping a coworker troubleshoot something remotely, and we eventually decided to split up and troubleshoot individually to try and cover more ground. He hadn't pushed his changes from his branch and I didn't want to completely drop what I was doing on my …

  7. Swift Combine's Result.Publisher

    Coming from a background in Java/Android development, I’m fairly familiar with working in RxJava and the reactive style of programming. Without getting into the details of said style, there’s a particular operator you can use called Observable.just(), which allows you to wrap a single value in …

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